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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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!a^#' 



r AND O 



'50 



College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Columbia University 

New York, New York 

I. A. JAFFE, Editor 
A. A. MESSER, Business Manager 



Sbedicaticm 



To Aura E. Severinghaus, scholar, teacher, coun- 
selor, friend, in expression of deep gratitude for his 
kindly advice and assistance in solving many per- 
plexing problems, this book is respectfully dedicated. 




AURA E. SEVERINGHAUS 



Joreword 



This is the half-way mark of a century that has 
seen great changes in the field of medicine. We feel 
it is fitting that P and S '50 record in picture and 
prose the training of doctors who are to meet the 
challenge of a future that holds even greater promise 
of advancement in the art and science of healing. 






SY • ttt^ 'f or ■ ^^^'^f^i ■ on 




DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER 

A.B., LL.D. 

President 

Columbia University 




WILLARD COLE RAPPLEYE 

A.M., M.D., Sc.D. 

Deon 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 



AURA EDWARD SEVERINGHAUS 

B.S., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Dean and Secretary 





( 




Virginia Apgar 
Anesthesia 



Harold W. Brown 
Public Health 



George F. Cahill 
Urology 



A. Benson Cannon 
Dermatology 




Samuel R. Detwiier 
Anatomy 



John H. Dunnington 
Opffia/mo/og)' 



Edmund P. Fowler 
Oto/ornygo/og/ 



Ross Golden 
Radiology 




Hans Clarke 
Biochemistry 



Magnus I. Gregersen 
P/5io/og/ 



10 



George H. Humphreys 
Surgery 



Clous W. Jungeblut 
Bocter/o/ogy 



Nolan D. C. Lewis 
Psychiatry 



Robert F. Loeb 
Medicine 



Rustin Mcintosh 
Pediatrics 




<F^ ** -, 




H. Houston Merritt 
Neurology 



Alan DeForest Smith 
Orthopedic Surgery 



Horry P. Smith 
Pathology 



Horry B. van Dyke 
Pfiarmoco/ogy 





Howard C. Taylor 

Obstetrics ar)d 
Gynecology _ .. 





11 




4 



th 




IRVING PAUL ACKERMAN 

68 Hansbury Ave., Newark, N. J. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Mass. Gen. Hospital, Boston, Moss. 



IRVING M. ADER 

310 Bleecker St., New York City, N. Y. 
A.B. N. Y. U.; M.A. Oberlin College 
Grasslands Hospital, Valhalla, N. Y. 



DONALD K. ADLER 

1675 West 9th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 

Moun* Sinai Hospital, New York, N, Y. 



GEORGE AGZARIAN 

828 V? S. Normandie Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
A.B. Univ. of California at Los Angeles 
University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



14 




JAMES S. APTHORP 

4 Harbor View, Marblehead, Mass. 

Harvard 

Hermann Hospital, Houston, Texas 



ROBERT W. BERRY 
627 Center St., Manchester, Conn. 
Dartmouth; Dartmouth Medical School 
The Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 



LEE E. BARTHOLOMEW 

22 Plymouth Rd., Summit, N. J. 

A.B. Dartmouth; Dartmouth Medical School 

Philadelphia General Hospital 



PETER BALL 

157 West 79th St., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Ohio Wesleyan University 
6e//evue Hospital, New York City 



15 




WILLIAM CLARKE BILLINGS 
Mulder Lane, Midland Park, N. J. 
A.B. Dartmouth 
Bel/evue Hospital, New York City 



CHARLES R. BLAIR 

5 Tudor City Place, New York, N. Y. 

B.S., Ed.B., M.S. Washington State College 

St. Luke's Hospital, New Yorlc, N. Y. 



DAMON D. BLAKE 

305 S. Wenatchee Ave., Wenatchee, Wash. 

B.S. University of Washington 

Salt Lake County General Hospital 



AUDREY KATHLEEN BROWN 
204-04 42d Ave., Bayside, L. I. 
A.B. Barnard; M.A. Columbia 
Bel/evue Hospital, New York City 



16 



ROSWELL STONE CHEVES, JR. 

15 Avon Place, Springfield, Mass. 

A.B. Yale 

Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 



EDMUND COLON GAULDEN 

Orangeburg, N. Y. 

B.S., M. I. T. 

6e//evue Hospital, New York City 



RICHARD J. CONROY 

2402 Avenue N, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dartmouth 

Bel/evue Hospital, New York City 



BERNARD COOPERMAN 

625 West 164th St., New York, N. Y. 

Columbia College 

Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 




CHARLES E. CRANDALL 

580 Prospect St., Maplewood, N. J. 

A.B. Princeton 

Be//evue Hospital, New York City 



ELIZABETH JONES CRANDALL 
580 Prospect St., Maplewood, N. J. 
A.B. Wellesley 
8e//evue Hospiial, New York City 



WILLIAM E. CROSBY, JR. 
8601 Fourth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
A.B. Univ. of Illinois; M.A. Columbia 
Be//evue HospHal, New York Cify 



MARY JEAN DANAHER 
4325 Bryant Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
A.B. Minnesota; M.A. Columbia 
Be//evue Hospital, New York City 




H. DANIEL DE WITT 

12 Mooneland Road, Montgomery, Ala. 

A.B. Yale 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



AIMEE F. DIEFENBACH 

2540 — 30th Rood, L. I, City, N. Y. 

A.B. Hunter 

Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



RUSSELL W. DORN 
893 Pavonia Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 
B.S. Clemson; M.A. Louisiana State U. 
Jersey City Medical Center 



RUTH B. EDMONDS 

New Yorl< City 

Barnard College 

Monmouth Memorial Hospital, Long Branch, N. J. 




B. THOMAS EDWARDS 

928 North Second Ave., Tucson, Arizona 

University of Arizona 

Charity Hospital, New Orleans, La. 



DOROTHY ESTES 

870 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Wheaton 

Grace-New Haver) Comrriunity Hospital 



CARL R. FEIND 

100 Haven Ave., New York, N, Y. 
A.B. University of Texas 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



JOHN FITZGERALD 
Springfield, Mass. 
B.S. Mass. State College 
M. /. T., Cambridge, Mass. 





JAMES G. FOULKS 
524 W. 1 69th St., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Rice Institute; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
U. S. P. H. S. Fellowship, Columbia 



GEORGE JAY FRANKEL 

2015 University Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

A.B. N. Y. U.; M.S. Fordhom 

Kings County Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MARY GABRIELSON 

100 Haven Ave., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Smith College 

Bellevue Hospital, New York City 



WARREN GLASER 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



21 




MAURICE F. GOODBODY 

151 E. Palisade Ave., Englewood, N. J. 

A.B. Williams College 

St. Lukes Hospital, New Yorfc City 



NORMAN L. GRANT 

625 W. Madison St., Lansing, Micii. 

Rutgers University 

Fitzsimmons General Hospital, Denver, Co/o. 



STANLEY J. GROSS 

Port Washington, Long Island, N. Y. 

B.S. Yale 

Grace-New Haven Community Hospital 



KURT M. GUNDELL 

88-12 Elmhurst Ave., Elmhurst, L. I., N. Y. 

Columbia College 

Cincinnati General Hospital 



22 




JOHN GUSSEN 

144 W. 76th St., New York, N. Y. 
D.D.S. University of Stockholm, Sweden 
New Yorfc Hospital 



ARTHUR HAUT 

2720 Grand Concourse, New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



GEORGE HAROLD HARRIS 

6035 Tyndall Ave., New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Columbia University 

Maine General Hospital, Portland, Me. 



WARREN HELLER 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Syracuse University Medical Center Hospitals 



23 




LEE HIRSCH 

1 895 Morris Ave., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Columbia College 
Brooklyn Jewish Hospital 



ROBERT A. HOEKELMAN, JR. 

61 Cortlandt Place, Cliffside Park, N. J. 

A.B. Dartmouth; Dartmouth Msdical School 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hosp., Hanover, N. H. 



MICHAEL HUME 

New Milford, Conn. 

A.B. Yale 

The Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 



ISRAELI A. JAFFE 

2 Herrick Drive, Lawrence, L. I., N. Y. 
B.S. New York University 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



24 



JOHN PUTNAM JAHN 
2323 Eunice St., Berkeley, Calif. 
A.B. University of California 
Son Francisco Hospiial 



A. GREGORY JAMESON 

Branford, Conn. 

A.B. Harvard 

Be//evue Hospital, New York City 



ROBERT STEVEN JAMPEL 

2735 University Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

Columbia College 

University Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich. 



HENRY A. JOHNSEN, JR. 

13 W. 108th St., Orangeburg, N. Y. 

A.B. Brov/n University 

U. S. Public Health Service, Stolen Island, N. Y. 




BILLY RUAL JONES 

705 Fairmont St., Amarillo, Texas 

B.S. Tufts College 

The Roosevelt Hospifal, New York City 



ROBERT F. JONES 
Cromwell, Conn. 
A.B. Wesleyan 
Hartford Hospital 



RALPH D. JUNKER 

4930 Goodridge Ave., Riverdale, N. Y. 

Corleton College 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York City 



M. DOROTHEA KERR 

400 W. 140th St., New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Ohio State University 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York City 




ALVIN LEBENDIGER 
353 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
A B. Columbia College 
Philadelphia General Hospital 



CHARLES M. LEWIS 

467 Central Park W., New York, N. Y. 

Princeton 

Syracuse University Medical Center Hospitals 



JULIA KUO-FANG LING 
619 W, 140th St., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Bryn Mawr College 
6e//evoe Hospital, New Yor,'< City 



WARREN A. LINHART 

4 W. 602 St., Stianks Village, Orangeburg, N. Y. 

B.S. Queens College 

Queens General Hospital, New York 




HERMOGENES J. LOPEZ 

Boyaca 120, Valencia, Venezuela 

B.S. Manhattan College 

The Rochester General Hospital, New York 



WILLIAM E. LUCAS 

540 Woodmont Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Princeton 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



JAMES A. MACDONALD 

1 North Brookwood Dr., Montclair, N. J. 

A.B. Princeton 

The Roosevelt Hospital, New York City 



JOHN McGREEVY 

Teaneck, N. J. 

A.B. Wesleyan; Dartmouth Medical School 

U. S. Pub//c Health Service, Norfolk, Va. 





ROBERT L. McKENNA 

331 E. 71st St., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Yale 

Bellevue Hospital, New York City 



MALCOLM STILLMAN MACKENZIE 

Cooperstown, N. Y. 

B.S. Harvard 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



ROGER A. MAC KINNON 

49 Brayton St., Englewood, N. J. 

Princeton 

Edward W. Sparrow Hospital, Lansing, Mich. 



D. HUGH MAC NAMEE 

12 Appleby Rd., Wellesley, Moss. 

Dortmoutti College 

Newton-Wellesley Hospital, Wellesley, Moss. 



29 




HARVEY N. MANDELL 

Norwich, Conn. 

A.B. Dartmouth; Dartmouth Medical School 

Rhode Island Hospital; Providence, R. I. 



ALFRED A. MESSER 

RED No. 1, Mendham, N. J. 

B.S. Rutgers 

Bellevue Hospital, New York City 



GORDON R. MEYERHOFF 

2 East 703d St., Orangeburg, N. Y. 

A.B. Brooklyn College; M.A. Obsriin College 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 



ELLIOTT MIDDLETON, JR. 

617 West 168th St., New York, N. Y. 

Princeton 

Presbyterion Hospital, New York City 



30 




RICHARD S- MORGAN 

Princeton, N. J. 

A.B. Princeton 

M. /. T., Cambridge, Mass. 



DWIGHT F. MORSS, JR. 

222 Woodland Rd., Madison, N. J. 

B.S. Ursinus College 

Pennsylvania Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. 



JOSEPH M. MOYNAHAN 
269 Belmont St., Worcester, Mass. 
B.S. Holy Cross College 
6e//evue Hospital, New York Cily 



HANS WERNER NEUBERG 

383 Central Park W., New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Wagner College 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



31 




LIVINGSTON PARSONS, JR. 
Mayfair Lane, Greenwich, Conn. 
A.B. Princeton 
Bellevue HospHal, New York City 



SEYMOUR PERLIN 

New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Princeton 

Fellowship, Psychiatric Institute, New York City 



NATHAN POKER 

302] Avenue W, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A.B. Brookyin College 

Be//evue Hospital, New York City 



LOUIS A. PYLE, JR. 

89 Fairview Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

A.B. Princeton 

University of Oregon Hospital, Portland, Oregon 



32 



DAVID JOHNSON REISNER 

651 W. 169th St., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Wesleyan 

St. Luke's Hospital, New York City 



ARNOLD B. RITTERBAND 

307 E. Tremont Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York City 



MARTIN ARTHUR RIZACK 
1450 Jesup Ave., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Columbia College 
Be//evue Hospital, New York City 



STEVEN S. SARKISIAN 

New York, N. Y. 

Columbia College 

Ellis Hospital, Schenectady, N. Y. 




JOHN E. SARNO, JR. 

2059 McGraw Ave., Bronx, N. Y. 

Kalamazoo College 

U. S. Marine Hospital, Staten Island, N. Y. 



ROLF SCHOLDAGER 

New York, N. Y. 

B.S. University of Brussels 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



MARTIN SILBERSWEIG 

104-43A 1 19th St., Richmond Hill, N, Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Amount Sinai Hospital, New York City 



WILLIAM J. SILVERBERG 

34-20 — 30th St., Astoria, L. I., N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 




ARTHUR IRWIN SNYDER 

27-26 Cold Spring Rd., For Rockaway, N. Y. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Presbyterian Hospital, New York City 



ELMER E. SPECHT 

207 Pennsylvania Rd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

A.B. Princeton 

Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center 



DONALD H. STUHRING 

26 Cottage St., South Orange, N. J. 

A.B. Princeton 

Hartford Hospital 



EDWARD TAMLER 

260-46 Langston Ave., Bellerose, N. Y. 
B.S. C. C. N. Y.; B.S. Columbia 
Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City 




NEIL RANDALL TAYLOR 

28 Hillside Ave., Englewood, N. J. 

B.S. Bowdoin 

tAeyer Memorial Hospifal, Buffalo, N. Y. 



JASON ALVIN TEPPER 

1117 Earl Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 

A.B. Union College 

Syracuse University Medical Center Hospitals 



DOUGLAS GORDON TOMPKINS 
570 N. Arden Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
A.B. Yale 
Presbyterian flospital, New York City 



DONALD PAUL TSCHUDY 

6 N. Rumson Ave., Margate, N. J. 

A.B- Princeton 

Presb/ter/on Hospital, New York City 





FRANCIS B. TRUDEAU, JR. 

Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

A.B. Yale 

8e//evue Hospital, New York City 



FREDERICK VAN POZNAK 

832 Winchester Ave., Hillside, N. J. 

B.S. Tufts College 

tenox Hill Hospiiol, New Yorfc City 



BEVERLY GROAT WAGNER 
Delevan, N. Y. 

A.B. Houghton College; M.A. Columbia 
Millard Fillemore Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y. 



WILLIAM EDWARD WAGNER, JR. 
484 Stuyvesont Ave., Irvington, N. J. 
A.B. Princeton 
Oronge Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J. 



37 




HENRY POST WARD 

Newark, N. J. 

B.S. Yale 

Be//evue Hospital, New Yoric City 



MYRON H. WEISBART 
1015 Gerard Ave., New York, N. Y. 
A.B. Columbia College 
Philadelphio General Hospital 



STANLEY SHEPHERD WEISS 

721 Walton Ave., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Princeton 

Jewish Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



J. HUSTON WESTOVER 

209 Walnut St., Latrobe, Pa. 

A.B. Columbia College 

Mary /mogene Bassett Hasp., Coopers/own, N. Y. 



38 




RAYMOND W. WILHELMI 

824 Emerson Ave., Alliance, Neb. 

A.B. Nebraska Wesleyan; Ph.D. N. Y. U. 

Colorado General Hospital, Denver, Colo. 



JOHN T. WILSON, JR. 

New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Howard University 

Meyer Memorial Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y. 



DANIEL McCOY WINTERS 

455 E. 14th St., New York, N. Y. 

A.B. Dartmouth; Dartmouth Medical School 

St. Vincent's Hospital, New York City 



MAX MING-KWAI ZUNG 

4 1 9 West 1 2 1 St St., New York, N. Y. 

B.S. Columbia College 

Oronge Memorial Hospital, Orange, N. J. 



39 



CLASS OF 1950 



Now at that point in fourth year when one 
treats professors lil<e people, nurses like 
women, and looks at exams with contempt, we 
felt that we might pass on to the 3rd, 2nd, and 
1st year classes a cache of "white papers," long 
hidden in the faculty files, which records the 
minutes of the yearly faculty meetings at which 
the fate of the class of 1950 was decided. 

At the exits from all labs there are electric 
eyes, and in the sinks of the 8th and 9th floors 
there are Geiger counters and hidden micro- 
phones, all of which have aided their collection 
of data. 

We have excerpted here the more representa- 
tive portions. 

First year faculty meeting: 

Dr. Detweiler: Where did Sevie get this class? 
Some of them are older than I, and some of them 
have the most fantastic questions. One boy 
wanted to know the area of the capillary bed. 
Say, Magnus, how would you go about answer- 
ing a silly question like that? 

Dr. Gregerson: Well, Det, you see, the square 
root of T 1824 when recorded in Evan's blue 
ink plus the — well, it's very simple and I'll show 
you when I find Hans Neuberg's mid-year exam. 

Dr. Detweiler: All I know is we're going to 
have to be careful about keeping up, boys. I 
understand that Chuck Blair even told Byron here 
about Archimedes' Principle. 

Dr. Clarke: Well, we seem to have kept ahead 
of them at least on carbohydrate metabolism. 
When they began looking cocky we sent Stetten 
into the pit to introduce another "cycle" at 180 
words a minute. 

Dr. Gregerson: We've managed to hold them 
in check. Dr. Wong has been explaining the 
action of the autonomic nervous system, and we 
haven't hod a single question since he started 
his demonstration. We've been having Carl 
Feind sit up in the front row when Dr. Root 
spins the cats for cerebellar tests. We also kept 
Billy Jones busy rounding up decoraticate cats — 
a good job for a Texan. 

Dr. Truex (looking at class pictures): Say, who 
is this fellow Gussen? Haven't seen him around 



the lab. And is this a student — this one called 
Foulks? I thought he was an assistant. It's about 
time I stopped him when he strolled out of lab 
at 2:30. 

Ah! here's B. G. — the boy who memorized 
the seventeen muscles attached to the scapula 
and then couldn't remember that it was to the 
scapula that they were attached. Give him a 
good grade for effort. That goes for Dave Reis- 
ner, too. He's no shirker. Do you know he was 
dissecting down to bone until we told him thai 
the bone boxes were already made up, and that 
he didn't have to fill them. 

The radius question on the practical certainly 
separated the sheep from the goats. 7^ "sheep" 
called it a clavicle! Why, Ed Colon wouldn't take 
my word for it and attached it to the sternum 
of the skeleton just to show me that if it wasn't, 
by gum, it should be! 

Dr. P. Smith: This class has come a long way In 
histology. At the beginning of the year. Dr. 
Engle reported overhearing Dwight Morss say he 
wouldn't recognize liver under the microscope 
even with two strips of bacon beside it. 

Lately, Jean Danaher refused to ascribe to Dr. 
Copenhaver's Unitarian theory of hematopoiesls. 
She charged it was an unpsychological attempt 
to force herd thinking. I think this demonstrates 
the class Is becoming interested in the theoretical 
aspects of Histology. 

I've always thought the boys seemed quite 
eager — all trying to sit in the front row for my 
lectures. 

Dr. Elwyn: Our little Neuroanatomy quiz sec- 
tions have been revealing. There's a small group 
who seems to concentrate on the Red nucleus. 
Another larger group seems unable to concen- 
trate on anything during lecture. They have even 
suggested that I apply for the Kiddies' Lullaby 
Hour on a local radio station. 

While the faculty sat discussing us in this man- 
ner we hopefully packed our bags and nervously 
sweated out the lost week. With exams over we 
hoped we had come one year closer to an M. D., 
and when the faculty's decision was mode known, 
we joyfully took off for our one and only sum- 
mer vocation. In subsequent years our talents 



40 




Top left: The uptown poker club. Top right: Doug sweating out fourth year. Bottom left: It's different in 
the labor room. Bottom right: Of course he hears it. 



were considered indispensable — a fact shared 
by faculty and students with mixed emotions. 

In September, the hay fever sufferer returned 
to ENT clinic and the student to microscope and 
bunsen burner. Bacteriology with its carbohy- 
drate capsules and type specific muco-polysac- 
charides (although just short of bearable) would 
have passed by without such strong resentment 
had it not been for the weekly injections of ty- 
phoid vaccine which were always administered 
on Friday afternoons, and our arms felt like 
freshly baked potatoes for the better part of the 
week-end, making gridiron cheering of a Satur- 
day afternoon well nigh impossible. 

In Pathology, we began at the beginning, and 
when the elusive art of sharpening colored pen- 
cils with the razor's edge had been mastered by 
even the most bungling members of our group, 
we set about delving into the private life of the 



omnipresent and omnipotent (and if you will for- 
give me) anaplastic fibroblast. 

We can all remember the second year class 
party at which our growing esprit de corps fairly 
overwhelmed us all. On that memorable occasion 
we were privileged to hear speak Dr. Joseph 
Skin of the Dept. of Pathology, whose case pres- 
entation of Mr. Ferdinand Dill, a 69-year-old 
w. d., w. n., NFSTD, white pearl diver from 
Oconomowoc, Wis., will long be remembered. 
Mr. Dill's rapidly fulminating downhill course 
from a metaplasia of his pseudosarcoblosts and 
his eventual death in pseudosarcoblostoma coma 
will long live in infamy. Our female members 
showed their ingenuity and ability with their pro- 
duction and its star, "Gypsy Rose" Kerr. 

By the time the second year faculty met to 
discuss our class progress we all had a Bauch 
and Lomb expression on our faces and had be- 



41 




come used to viewing the world from low and 
high power, except on week-ends when most of 
what we saw seemed under oil. Microscopes hod 
become so much a part of us that we began to 
think that their presence at our desks, even in 
the absence of the rest of our bodies, would be 
representative of attendance at Pathology. H. P. 
— from what we found in the faculty fries — 
didn't think so. Further, he felt our attitude to- 
ward the course was becoming quite lax. "Pen- 
cils," he would soy, "not heads, must come to 
a point." At the meeting that year he seemed 
quite bitter. 

Dr. Smith: Gentlemen, I may have to speak 
to the trustees about hiring another guard to 
stand watch at the door of the amphitheater 
after 9:05 A. M. I'm having a terrible time with 
students coming late to my lectures. Take Charli3 
Crandall and Dick Morgan, for example. They 
never get there before 9:30. 

Dr. Franz: But, H. P., Crandall is still honey- 
mooning. You can't expect him to be there on 
time! 

Dr. Ragan: Joe, I wonder if we got the stu- 
dents confused by disagreeing on so many sub- 
jects in Clinical Pathology. Do you really expect 
them to be able to differentiate a monocyte 
from a myelocyte? 

Dr. Turner: I don't know Charlie, but from the 
result of some of those quizzes I'd soy some one 
was confused. Of course I expect them to tell 
the difference between a monocyte and a my- 
elocyte. I read Wintrobe the night before that 
particular lecture and he said that it wasn't 
difficult at all. Irv. Ackerman never did seem to 
have any trouble, and Mrs. Halavko knows the 
difference. 

Dr. Brown: The most confused person I've run 
across in the class so far is George Fronkel. He 
was quite elated when he succeeded in finding 
so many hookworm ova in a stool specimen; then 
he discovered he was examining his own stool. 
He was practically on his knees begging some- 
one to tell him it wasn't so. He iust kept re- 
peating ova and ova, "But doctor, I've never 
been to Alabama!" 



< 



Top: Bull, bull, and more bull. Second. Sorno at the key- 
board. Third: Terzion lokes To'ylor. Boftom.- Two packs? Were 
Ihey king sized or regular? 



._r><. / 



i 




Top left: Hirsch ond Mondell working it off. Top right: McKenno interviews Robinson and Componeiia. 
Bottom /eft: Twelve o'clock tiigti. Bottom righl: Ten days at tiard labor. 



So ran the records of the second year ineet- 
ing showing that we had begun to champ at the 
bit going over and over basic science material. 
The faculty, however, seemed to realize that our 
apparent disinterest was really a desire to get 
into the clinical aspect of medicine. Therefore, 
with the termination of physical diagnosis we 
proudly acquired the badge of our chosen pro- 
fession, the stethoscope, and assured ourselves 
that we were now on the fringe of true clinical 
medicine and that the inestimably large gap 
between pre-clinical and clinical medicine had 
been successfully crossed. We had acquired new 
pride and confidence and hod picked up the 
elements of that inimitable medical jargon which 
disguises common garden variety words so that 
they are understandable only to the physician. 
From this point we may have had pyrexia, but 
never fever; we may have experienced anorexia, 
but never lost our appetite. Similarly we sagely 
came to take for granted that S.B.E, did not 
stand for soft boiled egg, that P. A. was not 
Prince Albert, that L.M.D. meant only lousy med- 



ical doctor, and S.O.B. meant — short of breath. 
Surely we all felt that at lost we were learning 
something; progress had begun to be made. We 
were beginning to rise above the common herd 
of humanity. Perhaps we had arrived. 

With the advent of our third year, end-to- 
end anastomosed to the terminal segment of our 
second, our class was divided into four parts — 
the groups were Medicine, Surgery, Specialties, 
and electlves. Also in our third year, the class 
received a transfusion of new green blood from 
Dartmouth. 

The records show that the third year faculty 
had become quite enthusiastic about our class. 

Dr. Humphries: Good afternoon. Fowler. I 
came early to get out in time for Virginia's cock- 
tail party. Where's the class list? Now, let's see, 
Feind? . . . 

Dr. Fowler: Yes, George, remember that name. 
He's specializing with me in ENT. He should get 
A's. At least he knows the ear and therapy with 
streptomycin. 

Dr. Humphries: This girl, Dot Estes, helped me 



43 




Left: Who ees thees fellow Paul White? Center; Tell her to hold it! Right: Increased densities. 



on a hydrocoele operation this afternoon. She's 
a good girl. I thought she was asleep, but she 
said she was right on the ball. 

Dr. Loeb: You know, I agree, this class is really 
good. Each student did at least 800 blood 
counts, 750 urines, and 543 stools. They know 
how to do lab work outside the sink. And pre- 
senting — why, Nat Poker made wire recordings 
of all his presentations before he came in on 
Friday. I think every third-year man at Bard 
should hove a recorder. I'll suggest it to Dean 
Roppleye. He'll get Evelyn and Jim to take care 
of it. 

Dr. Merritt: I've been looking at the class pic- 
tures. Who is this red-headed fat boy? I haven't 
seen him at Neurological. 

Dr. Loeb: Oh, that's DeWitt. I thought of hav- 
ing him assemble his gems for the house staff 
for a formal course; then I caught him chewing 
gum while i was lecturing. Don't confuse him 
with Ray Jaffe, the boy who wears a vest. I've 
marked Ray; he took Yale's second-year lecture 
on clothes to heart. 

Dr. Turner: These men should know more 
scientific medicine. I doubt that many of them 
could do a serum amylase as accurately as Tom 
Cheves does at 2 A. M. 



Dr. Severinghous: Sorry I'm late. I've been 
held up. Forty people still wont July vacations, 
and between getting this class married, their 
children born, houses at Shanks, baby sitters, 
and scholarships, I haven't had time to think 
about where I wont them to intern. On that score, 
I'm sure you wont them to intern at the better 
hospitals, so I'm expecting you to cooperate on 
the matter of grades. We can't hove the Boston 
and Baltimore groups outdo us In placing men 
in the top spots. 

Dr. Loeb: I say, Cannon, my "Juniors" have 
been reporting to me that this third-year class 
is so impressed with your L. P. technique they 
hove refused to use our studied twenty-towel, 
two-nurse, three-syringe, asceptic method. 

Dr. Cannon: Well, suh, I've done so many 
L. P.'s on the crowned heads of Europe and 
Washington that I think I've found the essential 
mistake you all have been making. You all don't 
relax up there on Medicine. Why, all you have 
to do Is relax your wrist, after turning bock your 
French cufFs, of course (you mustn't be careless), 
and lunge forward. I haven't missed one in 40 
years. 

Dr. Loeb: Well, I do suppose that some of my 



44 



Intern iuniors are fussy, but we must preserve 
P. H. technique. 

Dr. Taylor: I thougtit this class was very con- 
cerned with technique. Most of my lectures on 
practical obstetrics and gynecology were well 
attended. I might add that there wasn't a single 
case of pseudocyesis reported in this year's 
group. 

These notes from the third-year faculty meet- 
ing showed us that the faculty was beginning to 
think of us OS individuals, and by the time June 
of 1949 had rolled around the average student 
was, in his own estimation at least, an estab- 
lished clinician and more than ready to assume 
the decadent fourth year life. We had reached 
the promised land. 

Due to circumstances beyond our control, the 
fourth year history can no longer be recorded 
via the hidden microphone. There was only one 
faculty meeting that year for the sole purpose 
of deciding whether we would have comprehen- 
sives or not, and thus far no report has arrived. 

The fourth year — that wonderful, glorious, 
slap-happy, restful fourth year. They even called 
us "doctor." The class split into six isolated 
parts, but there were a few outstanding memo- 
ries common to us all. 

First and foremost, the 10 days of incarcera- 
tion in the labor room — "For God's sake, doctor, 
it's a baby, not a football — steady, steady!" 

The running feud with the student's "friend" 
— the obs. nurse — then for a little variety. Dot 
Estes and B. O. Plenty. Let us never forget those 
invaluable meal tickets. They fed many a starv- 
ing, deserving medical student for the rest of 
the year. 

On to Bellevue, where the gambling instinct 
flourished and we learned the inestimable art 
of inspection (only the more hardy souls ven- 
tured close enough to the patients to practice 
other methods of physical diagnosis) that, plus 
the ego-destroying phenomenon of lung cavities 
that vanished under the fluoroscope. 

Now we were ready for electives — Goldwater, 
with its memories of long hours in the dining 
room faithfully waiting for second helpings; 



INTERNSHIP PARTY. Top: V^e've never hod a belter yeor. 
Second: "With our sincere appreciation."' Third: Fill 'em up 
'till we flocculate. Boftom: Moke your home in Nome. 



^/j>jn 





Top /eft. Poker comes out. Top right: Which one has the Toni? Bottom leil: Off to Coopsrstown — hohl 
Soffom right; You can't go out every night. 



Cooperstown, 220 miles from the Ivory Tower, 
where we finally got our hands on a real, live 
patient all our own; St. Luke's, where we were 
treated like doctors and gentlemen, and Roose- 
velt, with its television and pool table. 

Then that vague, nostalgic month of Special- 
ties — X-ray quizzes, bladder chatter, orthopods, 
and Thursday afternoons with Dr. Miller: "Now, 
doctah, look at that patient again. You all must 
learn skin covers the whole patient." Finally, 
vacations — that long-awaited month — off to 
parts unknown. It was wonderful to learn the art 
of loafing again. 

Back to Group Clinic, an amiable, instructive 
two months of being a diagnostician (not a bad 
racket at all]. Last, Pediatrics with those darling, 
squalling little brats only a mother could love; 
Don Tschudy and Charley Lewis made the su- 
preme sacrifice — measles. At various limes 



throughout the year, the independents of the 
class hopefully anticipated graduation and took 
substitute interneships at hospitals throughout the 
city. Apparently they were much enjoyed, espe- 
cially the new sensation of giving an order and 
having it obeyed. They also learned the truth 
of the old saw, "The interne toils from sun to 
sun. Tween nurses and work, it's never done." 
Then there were the lectures — outstanding in 
more ways than one, being Saturday morning. 
Judging by attendance, a large segment of the 
class was unaware lectures were scheduled, but 
there's always the "Old Faithfuls," the group 
of 1 1 int3rnes-elect of the Columbia Division, 
Bellevue, who were always present at the 8-9 
class. And then there was Forensic Medicine 
with its fascinating rotogravure and Dr. Hanger's 
diagnostic class where the by-now medical ex- 
perts learned there's many a slip 'twixt proto- 



46 



col and posf. As everyone knows, the climax of 
the year was Interneships. The tortured applica- 
tions — recommendations that praised without, 
shall we say, influencing; and the eternal ques- 
tion, "'Wonder how the Dean'll phrase it?" — 
"This boy is in the uppermost portion of the 
lower tenth of the class; he has shown marked 
improvement in his clinical years, etc." Then the 
interviews, with the anxious moments of waiting 
outside the office, the delicate ethics of stating 
that each hospital was first in your heart, and 
those sadistic questions: Hemochromatosis, grams 
protein In the rice diet, and how many syn- 
dromes can you name in thirty seconds. The 



night of Nov. }5 — waiting for the ringing of the 
telephone or that messenger of fate, the W. U. 
boy. And the Dean's office with Dr. S. in shirt- 
sleeves, juggling like mad and his ever-faithful 
wife attempting to assuage our hyperacidity with 
tea and cookies. Finally, it was all over but the 
gossip of who went where and why. Not quite, 
though, for there was the next day's party — 
103 students in a state of euphoria, and a big 
time had by all. 

Well, it's about at an end now, and for be 
it from us to say we're sorry, but all in all, it 
was fun and, as we've tried to show, it had its 
moments. So orchids to us, we've made it! 



AT HOME — 100 HAVEN. Top left: Widge and Gaby stock up. Top right: John and Ana and baby makes 
three. Bottom left: George, Agnes and Cecil makes three. Boftom right: Winnie directs Carl in a new 

project. 




n tm 






AT HOME— SHANKS 



The Gulden's by the 
min, 
\ fireplace 



Keeping up with the 
Joneses 



Roughing it with the 
Linharts 



Bed time at the 
Crosbys" 



Sorry, but Gordy has 
to study tonight 



Hank studies without 
distraction 



Top; Roy puis finishing touches on P&S "50. What's cookin' tonight, Mabel? Amor wincit omnia — the 

doctors Crandatl. Middie: Another insurance agent. One more for the road. Hello Barbara. Soffom; The 

Maxwell serenade. You soy you wont a full poge? Does the fomily gel o discount dear? 




3 



rd 




■m^:^: 





yf 



\ 







^ 




\ 



/ 



% 




] 




Boc'f row; Donald Kosprzak, Steven Fierstein, John Carr, David Sie- 
bert, Richard O'Conneli, Lorry Werther, Frank Symonds, Frank John- 
son, Barbara O'Conneli. 



Middle row: Jim Stormont, John Decker, William Walsh, Wynne 
Sharpies, Nicholas Van Leeuv^en, Barton Smith. 

Front row: Edward Willliams, Morton Binder, Larry Ross, Nelson Holm- 

quist. 



52 




Back row. Julian Orleans, Alfred Edinburg, Elmer Pader, Walter 
Wood, William Vogt, Monroe Himmelstein, Maxine Dark, Fred 

Lewis. 

Middle row: Virginia Kannick, Julian Kaiser, Anthony Leftkowitz, 
Nicholas Christy, Bert Cominskey, Baruch Blumberg, Elizabeth Wood. 

Front row. Richard Banfleld, William Revercombe, Donald Andrew, 
John Hanlon, Eriand Nelson. 



53 



CLASS OF 1951 



ARGYLL Q. ROBERTSON is awakened by 
that inner voice crying: "You're not learn- 
ing a thing rolling around in the sack until 6:30, 
arise and study nature, not books, for these are 
the clinical years." Goaded by the realization 
that this is Friday, and he has the first bed on 
the left, he is careful to pick out just the right 
regimental stripe and smooth some extra ox- 
blood polish over his thick soled cordovans. 
Quickly checking the armamentarium of pens, 
multi-colored pencils, hemostat, bandage scis- 
sors, "pearl" pad, and vest pocket E. K. G., he 
pauses only long enough to test the razor-sharp 
edges of his cleats. 

At breakfast with a neurological colleague he 
hears news of the boys "fighting disease up- 
town." Our hero is somewhat surprised to see 
so few familiar faces up and about until he 
realizes that the surgeons only work half-day; 
nine to nine. 

Then it's off to the ward with a prayer for a 
short blood list and a brilliant day with the foil. 
Feeling more like a vampire than a blessed 
healer, he smiles grimly at each patient in turn 
as he tries to explain why 250 cc. are needed 
for this morning's test. While plowing blindly 
through rainbow-hued anticubitae, he tries to 
keep from thinking of the patient who just yes- 
terday went into grand mal seizure as one stu- 
dent tried to get 5 cc. for a vital serum asphalt. 
Finally it's over — the scrub-up tray is a shambles 
and two of the prothrombins clotted — but it's 
over. 

Now there's just time for a urine or two be- 
fore Dr. Loeb's rounds; so Argyll takes his place 
in the lab, already bustling with the activity of 
the rest of the drones, for this is Medicine be- 
fore the arrival of the technicians. Suddenly 
the cry "General Quarters" rings out above the 
tumult and the fetid little room spews forth its 
sweating multitude, leaving an anguished 
George to tidy up. "No towels today," he mut- 
ters, as he dodges a hematocrit tube tossed in 
the general direction of the sink by a flying 
flunky. As he takes his place in ranks, Argyll 
is pleased to note that the curtains are modestly 



drawn around cubicle first on the left. Mrs. Gon- 
zales is receiving her morning care on schedule 
— no use taking unnecessary chances. While they 
wait for the arrival of the Professor, the platoon 
leaders pace nervously, remembering that black 
Friday on which "the first roll call in thirty years" 
was taken. Now the hour strikes. The troops snap 
to attention, as Dr. Loeb and the Grand Dragon 
appear on the scene. And so rounds hove begun. 

Argyll knows from the frantic look on the face 
of the hapless character next to him that he has 
suddenly forgotten whether it was "bad blood" 
or the menarche which Mrs. Schultz first noticed 
at the age of six. As the presentation begins, 
our embryonic healer gives it his undivided at- 
tention for a while, but then his mind begins 
to wander back to other mornings during this 
all-important third year. Back to those carefree 
days on the wards of Shelter Island General 
during his summer elective, where team rounds 
are enlivened by a weenie roast on the beach. 
Back to those mornings as a slave on the 1 8th 
floor, every muscle crying out in rebellion after 
several hours hauling hooks. Back to that morn- 
ing on Otolaryngology when a well-known cig- 
arette manufacturer snapped his picture as he 
took that first exciting look through a head mir- 
ror. Back to that morning on Dermatology when 
he began wishing that Columbus had not been 
so damn friendly with the Indians. He is roused 
from these ramblings by a hearty "fiddle-dee- 
dee" and rejoinder to one rather long-limbed 
student to resist his atavistic tendencies and stop 
swinging from the curtain rods. 

Next, the gathering is transported to a mythi- 
cal cool flowing stream and a picture of the Pro- 
fessor flipping just the right flies into trout-laden 
pools. As a presentation resumes, Argyll's atten- 
tion again wanders, this time to the 20-year-old 
telephone operator who entered with chief com- 
plaint of tinnitus for two years. He wonders 
whether he will ever be able to consider such 
a delightful "distribution In space" as just one 
more physical finding. 

His musing takes him so for afield that he 
fails to notice the tense silence which has fallen 



54 




Top: Binder . . ."Wait 'til Dr. Loeb hears this!" Logon pocks It away. Middle: Dune . . ."Bard Hall, good 
evening," And the angels sing — John and Jon. Bottom; A large turnout for Public Health. Smith does 

onother CBC. 



55 



over the group until it is suddenly punctuated 
by the sickening thud of an alpenstock grinding 
into human flesh and a small-voiced; "Beryllium 
poisoning?" from one of the eager faces in the 
front row. The congratulatory handshake is mod- 
estly accepted and another beaver has climbed 
to the top of the dam. 

But now a glance at the clock tells the Pro- 
fessor that time has run out; so, with a benign 
smile at the human wreckage strewn around 
him, he makes a rapid departure, while some 
of the brighter lads try to keep pace for those 
last few words. 

Argyll is torn by mixed emotions. He is re- 
lieved that he did not get a chance to moke a 
fool of himself, yet at the same time it would 
be nice to have the ordeal out of the way, and 
then he did turn down a pair of theatre tickets 
shyly proffered by the head nurse, just so he 
could stay home and pin down those cases. Any- 
how he is delighted by the prospect of two 
weeks of grace. This bright ray is dulled some- 
what, however, by the daily noon conflict be- 
tween hunger and conscience. Argyll has de- 
vised a neat trick for resolving this in favor of 
the lecture by merely considering that the recent 
Increase In tuition brings an hour of instruction 
into the same economic bracket as a seat at the 
Polo Grounds. This mercenary reinforcement Is 
usually enough to tip the balance. It would a'l 
be so simple if the pelvis were a stovepipe and 
the fetal head a billiard boll. Almost before he 
realizes it the hour is over, the cord is cut, and 
our boy begins the mad dash for what some- 
one in the front office. In a masterful stroke of 
understatement, has described as overtaxed 
feeding facilities. Picking his way gingerly be- 
tween compressed air hammers and the general- 
ized shambles of reconstruction which will some 
day put the Persian Room to shame, he can't 
help but wonder what they found wrong with 
the old Cloaca. Luckily, there is no gendarme 
at the entrance; so no need for the well-re- 
hearsed speech explaining that medical students 
are an integral part of "The Team," and there- 
fore should be privileged to use the dining room 
along with the elevator men, orderlies, and other 
vital cogs. After a quick lunch and a nasty look 
from the cashier, our boy wonder is ready for his 



preceptor conference. These meetings vary wide- 
ly in the degree of trauma they entail, depend- 
ing on the nature of th instructor. Preceptors 
fall roughly into two categories. There are those 
who end every sentence with a "what am I 
thinking of now" question. This can be rather 
devastating, especially right after lunch. The 
other group is composed of individuals who 
seem to prefer the sound of their own voice to 
all other forms of auditory stimulation. Argyll is 
pleased that his preceptor falls into the latter 
category; it's more restful that way, and besides 
he occasionally picks up a pearl. 

We could continue this description of a day 
in the life of a typical third-year student ad 
nauseam, but to what avail. If in future years 
we are able to turn bock to these few lines and 
have them stir up fond memories, they will have 
served their purpose. The First Year was grim 
business for most of us. We were tackling some- 
thing entirely new. There were few associations 
to which to tie the vast amount of material wo 
were supposed to assimilate. If someone had 
told us that we were going to hear it all over 
and over again we might not have worried quit? 
so much. Still, we found time to mix pleasure 
with business, some even to the extent of getting 
married. Second Year we began to feel more 
at home. Interest began to pick up because we 
were learning about disease, still from the book 
— but more to the point. It was pleasant to find 
some of the things we had covered, coming up 
for a second time. We were generally looser, 
but quizzes kept us hopping. Now more of us 
were finding time to get married. Toward the 
end of the year the big transition really began, 
so gradually that few of us realized what was 
happening. That first physical diagnosis session 
at Bellevue or Goldwater showed us that the 
things we hod been reading about actually ex- 
isted in flesh and blood. 

Third Year has been on Improvement over the 
first two in that, now, we ore able to see the 
forest in spite of the trees. Atchley, Hanger, 
Loeb, and company hove given us some rough 
moments, and often made us feel like the char- 
acter by Abner Dean, but for the most part 
we've enjoyed the process. 

Now, it's third down, goal to go! 



56 




Top: There was a loose group on Center, Dr. Gut man's rounds were pithy. Middle: Honlon distorts the 
curve. Nelson dives for o pearl. Botfom; Busy intellects "at ploy." Werther . . , out on o Job. 



57 



2 



nd 





Front row: Denny Cox, Winthrop Fish, Judith Gedney, Mollie Cominsky, Win Angenent, 
Anthony Smith, Leslie De Groot, Gene Speicher. 

2nd row; James Smith, John Bozer, Marianne Wolff, Al Kidwell, Monroe Alenick, 
Peter Kornfeld, Al Morgolius, Paul Beres, Robert Ellsworth, John Ultmann, Dave 
BenninghoflF. 

3rd row: Pedro Arroyo, Len Brandow, Henry Payson, Bob Carlson, Sidney Fink, Stanley 
Schneider, William Garcelon, Bob Feldman, Bob Kassriel, George Allen, Will Waller, 
Joe Shipp. 

4th row: Jack Reynolds, Will Roosen, Don Gent, Hugh McCcslin, Ernie Reiner, Marc 
Key, Jack Orr, Elihu Silverman, Paul Gilbert, Bayard Clorkson. 



60 




Front row: John Taylor, Arch Jacobs, Gerry Siek, Bob Flowers, Tom Hamilton. 

2nd row: Bob Sllbert, Jack Shiller, Katherlne Lobach, Arno Mocholdf, Sam Hoch, Eliza- 
beth McKay, Minton Evans, Rosamond Kane, Rocco Roduezo, Duane Todd. 

3rd row: Murray Greene, Herb Magrum, William Van Duyne, Don Holub, Jim Hummel, 
Garth Dettinger, Harold Orvis, John Hosmer, Paul Gerst, John Cowles, Arthur Hall, 
Peter Scaglione. 

4fh row.- Lee White, Bill Reed, Pat Hoynes, Charles Doolittle, Ralph Suechting. 

5th row: Robert van Home, Jack Wheliss, John Heffernan, Joe White, Doug Sioberg, 
Henry Louria, Monroe Proctor, Jim Ketchum, Wallace Epstein. 



61 



THE 25+h REUNION DINNER OF THE CLASS OF '52: 



The year is 1977. 

The scene: The grand ballroom of one of 
America's most luxurious hotels. 

The festive group is composed in the main of 
extremely prosperous looking physicians; Phi Bet 
keys flash continuously In the bright light, and 
all are happily and busily dissecting the special 
turkeys prepared for the occasion. These birds, 
grown on the 12th floor at P & S, all have nega- 
tive heterophile agglutination titers, low anti- 
streptolysin values, and have been triple 
screened for carcinogen content. P & S, as we 
can see, is very anxious to insure the continued 
good health of this, its finest graduating body! 

As we circulate among the tables with Drs. 
Herbert, Wikler and Fink ... all of whom are 
taking pictures (proceeds to Class fund, as has 
been the custom since 1949) we overhear a sur- 
prising amount of reminiscence about experi- 
ences in Pathology, Bact, etc., which date back 
to that memorable year. Apparently even 27 
years cannot erase the memory of the private 
Path slips (groan ... my first 100 rating in 
Med school), of rabbits whose ear veins just 
wouldn't stand out (Herb Magram ... "I didn't 
know what I was doing, the rabbit didn't know 
what I was doing, and with the complicated 
index system to the lab manual, the Assistant 
didn't event know what I was supposed to be 
doing!") Memories recall pencils that wouldn't 
stay sharp, slide unknowns that really were un- 
known, and drawings that never quite satisfied 
. . . oh, to be a Bob Carlson! 

A commotion at the door . . . ah, here are 
latecomers. Dr. Reed, just arrived by plane from 
London, where he has been lecturing on "Vita- 
min C and the Russian Problem"; and Dr. Ale- 
nick, with his "camel-hair" scotch beret. (You 
could walk a mile, and still spot it). A commo- 
tion is flaring at the southern end of the ball- 
room, where Drs. Brandon, Key, Allen, Bragg, 
Flowers, Wheliss, Margolies, Orr & Shipp have 
risen to toast Will Waller's famous "individual 
rights" speech, dating back to the class meet- 
ings which debated everything from insurance 
policies to the wholesale price of a hemocy- 
tometer. This has started a buzz through the hall, 
as memories stir of Jack Shiller & Bill Pollin's 
savings plan, which . . . unexpectedly . . . 
brought the bookstore and Dean Severinghous 
to our class councils. Drs. Chanin, Todd & Ult- 



mann are joking together, apparently recalling 
their leading role in the Allergy lectures . . . 
it was so nice of Ellen to demonstrate serum 
sickness just before the oral quiz! A neurologist 
at this table ... is it Paul Beres? ... is speak- 
ing of Dt. Wolf's fine lectures; "If only they 
hadn't been given in the dark ... in that warm 
Amp. F . . . after we'd just been to Bard or the 
Cloaca." Arno Macholdt Is joking about the 
introduction to clinical problems presented that 
winter. "Big CPC's on Tuesdays, little CPC's on 
Thursday, and Clinical Pathology as a course. 
While the CPC's demanded imagination and 
some perspicacity, the latter demanded . . . and 
got . . . blood." In the NW corner of Path 
lab, on Tuesday mornings, Drs. Louria, Haynes, 
Hosmer, Ketcham et al learned as much differen- 
tial diagnosis as Pathology! That mid-year sem- 
ester with its pipettes and Sahli tubes plus seven 
other courses admittedly drew blood in more 
ways than one . . . but the ninth course! Will 
those of us who took special senses, with its 
relaxing labs (no exams, just dissection for 
pleasure and learning) ever forget Dr. Det- 
weiler's announcement to the effect that . . . 
"Gentlemen, the final exam will center about a 
beer keg in Bard Hall"? 

The Cominskys are here, laughing because 
someone has just reminded them how Molly used 
to arrive late in Bact. or Path Lob, after a quick 
cup of coffee with "her man." With them are 
Tom Hamilton and Bill Garcelon, who is saying: 
"We should have had time for more extra- 
curricular activities in second year." ... to 
which Drs. Scaglione and Schneider (with the 
Metropolitan and City Center Opera companies 
in mind) are emphatically nodding agreement. 
Marianne Wolff, we notice, is still surrounded 
by publishing house representatives. Since word 
got to Lippincott in late 1950 about the excel- 
lence of this class's thesis, Kay Lobach and Roz 
Kane (Class Historian Committee) and, of course, 
Jeanne Armstrong as Class Secretary, have had 
to help the "Keeper of the files" to keep track 
of the requests for publication rights which 
poured in from medical journals in every part 
of the world. 

Almost all memories of their first year have 
faded for these gentlemen, but not, apparently, 
those of their "Class Day," held in May, 1949. 
I hear chuckling stories of how Champ Bill Reed 



62 




Top: Vampire af work. Cominsky finds a tonsil. Middle: Win Angenent and our first patients. During a 
crucial inning ... Dr. Steinboch In BocT quiz session. Lower: A booster dose for brer rabbit. Macrocyte 

hunters. 



63 



licked up a Boston Cream pie in umpty seconds 
... of how Jack Shiller was willing to swim the 
Hudson (lucky no one brought a boat) ... of 
how "Legs" DeGroot and Frank Curran were 
runners-up to Joe Barlow in a men's leg show 
contest ... of Pedro Arroyo and Will Avery 
in a race where young "honorary" class mem- 
bers starred . . . and of a mighty tug of war 
wherein Drs. Orohovats, Cizek, Gillespie and 
Shemin helped th3 girls to win. And the ball 
games!! . . . how Sec B won a close victory 
over Sec A . . . Dave Wymon, Munro Proc- 
tor, Allyn Kidwell, Billy Van Duyne, Jerry Siek, 
Sam Hoch and Rocky Raduazo sure looked good 
that day. As for the gome with "Cizek's Sizzling 
Sluggers" . . . those fast pogs by Dr. Gillespie 
ore remembered yet! One first year Prof, recalls 
another, and mention of Dr. Detweiler's neu- 
roanatomy slide from the atlas of Gearshift and 
CrankshaTi showing the Mae Wcstiform body, 
[Ridiculous formation. Bundle of Laundry, etc., 
has caused a howl. Dr. Wong is remembered 
for his lecture on the cortex . . . "I II not label 
this diagram so as not to confuss"; Dr. Elftman 
for his pointed informoHon on life in the Chinese 
salt mines; Dr. Rittenb^rg and his lecture on 
entropy. Does anyone recall how he worked a 
pair of dice into it? . . . or the significance of 
a membrane impermeable to submarines? There 
is going to be entertainment tonight, which 
brings mention of Dr. Fleming's "hot" piano and 
clarinet playing. He still wears those "vivo" bow 
ties that have a basal rate of at least plus 50! 
Many can remember Dr. Clark, lecturing in his 
tennis shoes . . . and, thank heavens, Tony keep- 
ing pace with him. Also Dr. Miller, lecturing on 
the danger of too much polar bear liver in the 
diet, and his report on the little chap whose 
mother stuffed him with Vitamin A, to the detri- 
ment of his liver, blood, and fingers . . . but 
boy! could that little rascal see in the dark! 

The summer between first and second years 
was a big one for many people in the class, 
with Denny Cox, Bill Reed, Eli Silverman, Henry 
Payson and Arthur Hall visiting Europe; Ernie 
Tucker doing so as part of his temporary duty 
with the Merchant Marine. Gerry Wong returned 
to Honolulu, where wedding bells soon pealed, 
as they later did for the Abruzzis, Ghents, Her- 
berts and Wiklers. By 1950 engagement toasts 
were also due the Holubs, Wheliss's and Wilder- 
mans. 



The meal is over and President Shipp is ris- 
ing to speak. A sianding vote of applause is 
being given Joe, who is more responsible than 
any other one classmate for the wonderful class 
functions and the fine spirit built up during the 
first two years. Les DeGroot and Bill Chase, for- 
mer Vice-Presidents, are trying to bring about 
order . . . but except for Frank Curran, who is 
still eating . . . and Paul Gilbert, who is quietly 
offering a cigarette to Dr. Halpryn (Hilly has just 
fainted) ... no one listens. 

The program will begin with Murray Green, 
the world famous "Clinician with a rendition," 
who will play the harmonica. Scene II: Drs. 
Waller, Bivings and Ellsworth are giving their 
Andrews sisters' routine . . . their wives hove 
Just walked out . . . that made such a hit at 
the class party held in November, 1949, after 
completion of the course in Bacteriology. Scene 
III: More on the basso side than 23 years ago, 
and with their old white coats hardly getting 
around those middles, but just hear those boys 
sing! (Drs. Speicher, Reynolds, Cox, Fish and 
Jim and Tony Smith). Those boys brought down 
the house at the class party, and are doing it 
again now. Win Fish and Judy Gedney are do- 
ing a short take-off on Dr. hludack's Anatomy 
clinic . . . five minutes of so'^t speaking, then 
"Lookit those gams!" Phone for Dr. Reiner . . . 
and the same pun he made years ago: "Like 
the tubercle, I'm ghone!" Evesdropping at Lee 
White's table . . . Drs. Rousseau, Bob and Min- 
ton Evans report seeing a cose of ochronosis in 
California . . . I'll bet he has on old right knee 
injury also . . . there can't be two cases in one 
century! Another phone call . . . Prof. Loeb has 
some problems on which he'd like the assistance 
of Dr. Feldman. 

Pres. Shipp is bringing this very highly suc- 
cessful dinner to a close now, but has been 
interrupted by some last-minute announcements 
. . . Dr. Doolittle would like to meet Drs. Det- 
tinger, Arroyo, Avery, O'Loughlin and Raduazo 
to help recall some of the good old days at 
Shanks Village. Art Haelig requests "positively 
the last ten minutes of your time I shall take" 
to plug the insurance fund; Drs. Aboody, Beres 
and Silbert are seeking a fourth for bridge, and 
Drs. Kornfeld and Kassriel announce plans for 
a gala New Year's Eve party. 



64 




Top, leit Class picnic, spring '49. Bottom: "Time out" with Dr. Cizek. Right, top Prof. Vogt helps Hoines 
and Ketchom. Middle: The parlies were tops. Bottom: Bunnies 'N Bugs — Bad Lob. 



65 



1 



St 





Bottom row, sitting.- William Targgort, Franklin Newmark, Jose Lopez, Robert Leper, 
James Ware, John Williams, Seymour Kalectistein, Edwin Maynord, Jack Oppenheimer. 

Second row, sitting: Taul Errera, James Golub, Lester Cramer, Herbert Poch, Pierce 

Smith, Bernard Schoenberg, Julie Schoepf, James Terry, Vera French, Lucile Mahieu, 

Marvin Zimmerman, John DiJohn, Robert Milch, Jay Meltzer. 

Third row, standing: Frederick Duhl, Arthur Phinney, Howard Thompson, James Quinn, 

William Mohler, Jerry Dickinson, Norman Bank, Peter Ways, Stanley Edelman, Hoiyim 

Schwarz, Walter Reister, Marvin Skolnick, Benjamin Wright, Miguel Garcia, Ernest 

Vandeweghe, Colin McCord. 

Top row, standing: Joseph Alpers, Eugene Shekitka, William Rotton, Frederick Whit- 
comb, Pierre de Reeder, Robert Van Hoek, George Edison, Stanley dicker, Stanley 

Einhorn, Oscar Krieger. 



68 




Bottom row, sitting-. Robert BeMman, John Bryant, Robert Richie, Roscoe Stuber, Vol 

Wagner. 

Second row, sitting. James Thorpe, Daniel BenninghofF, Rudolph Klare, Lewis Kurke, 
Roberta Goldring, Joel Markowitz, Robert Milam, Herman Grossman, James Miller. 

Third row, standing. Warner Nash, Edgar Housepian, Arthur Larkin, Clayton De Haan, 
Thurman Givan, Douglas Richards, Richard Michaels, Howard Marraro, Millard Sap- 

pington, Robert Eddy. 

Top row, standing: James Neely, Joseph Karas, Arthur AronofT, John Burnham, Jerold 
Lowenstein, Clifton Howard, Le Roy McDaniel. 



69 



CLASS OF 1953 



WELL, the day was here. It was Monday, 
September 12th, the day they'd all been 
waiting for, while plugging those long four years 
at organic and zoology. "The 120" chosen 
from some 2,800 applicants were strolling about 
their new milieu, peaking into the besmoked 
students' room, and doing some heavy buying 
at the bookstores. They decided between Gray, 
Morris and Cunningham, listening intently and 
often unwisely to upperclassman advice. Indeed, 
they were all feeling overly proud about their 
past accomplishments and all ready to dig in 
for new conquests. 

For this was the real stuff now; no more get- 
ting it second-hand — in Arrowsmith, An Ameri- 
can Doctor's Odyssey, or The Horse and Buggy 
Doctor. Now would come the sophisticated trans- 
formation, the mastery of a new language, the 
understanding of new concepts, the acquisition 
of a huge bulk of vital information. Old mis- 
conceptions would be thrust away. 

All presumably came with some philosophic 
animus, influenced by the typical American lib- 
eral arts education, and tempered by the pull- 
ing power of the scientific method. Brought with 
them, therefore, was the desire to understand 
the basic principles of human organization and 
function. How does good old Homo Sapiens 
transform its energy (nutrition) bringing about 
its activities and responses to stimuli? How does 
the noblest of primates integrate these activities 
and responses? What, for example, is behind 
the often absurb behavior of humankind? 

They'd learn it all, like the famous song of 
Detweiler and Shapiro implied. And they'd learn 
much of the basic stuff in their first year — em- 
bryology, anatomy, microanatomy, psychiatry, 
biochemistry and physiology. 

But woe and begone, the work began to come. 
What philosophic analysis could be left in tired 
students memorizing a welter of facts. Their first 
week seemed like a term at college. They really 
welcomed the First Year Reception, sponsored 
by the P and S Club, that first Friday night. They 
were pleased to hear again how carefully they 
were chosen. Dean Serevinghous spoke and pro- 
vided some interesting statistics. The 129 stu- 
dents of the Class of 1953 received their under- 
graduate education in 47 colleges and come 
from 27 slates. About one-third were Gotham- 



ites. Sixty-five of the 108 males were vets. The 
average age of civilian students was 20; of vets, 
25. There were three foreign students in the 
class. Backgrounds of the students were interest- 
ing and diverse. Some had been physics and 
philosophy majors. They had been campus illuml- 
naries, athletic stars, magazine editors and class 
presidents. 

Having learned some more about themselves 
they went back to their jobs, and, excepting a 
Saturday night out, stayed with it — at least until 
after the first exam. They did take out enough 
time to elect their class officers. Quietly, the three 
best represented colleges put their candidates 
forward and Old Eli come out best. Pierce Smith 
and George Cahill were elected president and 
vice-president, respectively. How 'III Julie 
Schoepf of Vassor became secretory-treasurer 
is a problem for Mr. Kaltenborn. 

They were forced to take time out for physi- 
cal exams, and for X-rays that, "for technical 
reasons," had to be repeated. Some gave their 
life for science contributing their thyroids to the 
radio-active iodine experiments of Dr. Sidney 
Werner. Some gave their lives and blood to 
science and $10. 

They all met Albert after Professor Elftman 
very graciously Introduced them to the 30 
"stiffer" members of the class. 

"The Organizer" became a pass word. 
"Chuck" or "Spinal" Noback, as he was vari- 
ously called, to his face and behind his back, 
became a favorite, the only complaint being 
that he might be charming as hell but he dis- 
couraged rote memorization. They became 
enamored to correlative clinics, especially after 
Dr. Kneeland's dramatic presentation of a co- 
arctation of the aorta. All, save Princeton men, 
became equally enthralled with Dr. Cahill, who 
covered, among other things, the topic of how 
Princeton men became birds. In the correlative 
lectures they even were able to forget the un- 
pleasant seating built for dwarfs, and the poor 
ventilation which hardly bespoke for the health- 
consciousness of the P and S faculty. 

Some, at least, found the going unpleasant 
and rough. For what's intellectual about degluti- 
tion and micturition that swallowing and urina- 
tion won't take care of? Some of the "doctors- 
to-be" feared being institutionalized. They won- 



70 




Top: Bridge game at noon. Five minutes for a snack. Middle: Les Cramer in the locker room. There's 
always room for one more. Fred Duhl makes contact. Bottom; A quick snack offer anatomy. Taking off 

for the week-end. 



71 



dered about the white coat hierarchy. They 
were learning to judge to which class a student 
belonged. If he had a stethoscope he was a 
second year man; if tongue depressors jutted 
out of his pockets he was already doing rounds. 

Everyone was looking for the day he would 
reach that blue ground, especially by the time 
the first exams come in mid-October. By then 
they had scouted the restaurants in the area, 
were familiar with the Cloaca, had gotten their 
meal jobs at Bard. They had learned the proper 
nemonics, like the ones for the motor branches 
of the facial nerve, the branches of the external 
carotid and twelve cranial nerves, and no one 
would ever forget "Tilly" or the carpal bones. 
Some were buying every chart, textbook, and 
cram manual available. 

Of course, there was the bridge group that 
always emerges, and a few poker fiends ap- 
peared, paying for their lunches out of winnings 
from neophytes who couldn't get convinced that 
"inside straights" don't pay off. Of course, there 
was the extensive "Kaffee-Klatsch," which de- 
parted daily at 10:10 A. M. from Dr. Smith's 
famed laboratory after carefully setting up their 
scopes to carry on in absentia. 

As the exams approached a new word be- 
came current — spasticity. For the collective mus- 
cles of '53 P & S becamue taut; their tongues 
were especially rigid. Any noise brought an ex- 
aggerated reflex. The air was alive with newly 
acquired medical jargon; alive with the chatter of 
those who told more than they knew, and of those 
feigners who complained of knowing nothing. 

Conversation became fantastic. The Junior 
Medicos described people medically (or like the 
FBI). Persons had apoplectic faces, brown liver 
spots on their right cheek, or a cleft chin. 

Some stalwarts were influenced by "Cheaper 
by the Dozen" and made efficiency time and 
motion studies, developing special techniques for 
taking notes. Out came medical jargon, disturb- 
ing dates and families. Medical school jokes 
were the order of the day, including terms not 
always sanctioned by the Basle Anatomical Con- 
vention. 

After the first exam things cooled off; atti- 
tudes changed, students began to realize that 
P & S wasn't here to flunk them out and keep 
them under pressure. They could learn as suited 
their personalities. 

By the end of the second anatomy exam in 



early December, students were in good spirits. 
They put on a terrific freshman party under the 
jurisdiction of Jerry Dickinson. Fred Duhl of Co- 
lumbia College Varsity Show fame and Jim Neely 
of Princeton's Triangle Club worked up a new 
show. Fred wrote a catchy show number "It's All 
in Fun" and Jim wrote and delivered "I Am the 
Life of the Laboratory" using his facial muscles 
of expression to mimic the faculty. Lucky Jim 
also did a soft shoe number with Kansas Lucy. 
One major attraction of the show was "Dick" 
Shapiro and "Oscar" Detweiler's "Ova and Ova 
Again." 

As if it were part of the education, at least 
two of the boys found themselves in the operat- 
ing room. Both Pete Rittner and Grove Potter re- 
ceived appendectomies. 

Honors and fortune also came to three of the 
students, Philip Aisen and Fred Duhl, both of 
Columbia College, and Jay Meltzer of Princeton 
won New York State medical scholarships- 
Bob Eddy survived the birth of a boby son, 
Jonathan, in the fall. George Cahill was married 
in December, and pretty little Ana Cordero of 
Puerto Rico was married the evening of the last 
anatomy exam — not squeamish! 

By welcome holiday time the class had strug- 
gled through a plethora of exams, met the fabu- 
lous Lord Byron in neuroanatomy and prepared 
for the vacation by a few pre-pre-pre Christmas 
parties. With Christmas went everything intellec- 
tual. Social life breathed strong. 

Upon return from the holiday wassail the re- 
vived group settled down again to prepare for 
the neuro and gross finals. But they did find 
time to plan a skating party at Rockefeller Cen- 
ter which never did come off, because of the 
weatherman. Later, the class will hove an eve- 
ning roller-skating party at the Stork, says Neely. 

And while the topic is turned to the class 
comedian, mention must be mode of his and 
Freddie Duhl's fine efforts at the second Fresh- 
man party. Their performances were rudely in- 
terrupted, though. First of all some old Columbia 
fellow named Bob Milch had a battle over some 
girl, and then Bob Bielman attracted Mo Mallhan 
down a ladder. 

As the first half of their medical school coreer 
drew to a close P&S frosh were seen as half- 
oriented, half-sophisticated medicos hoping the 
results of their exams were commensurate with 
their happy feelings about a great school. 



72 




Top left: The A-Moral choral end dish-washing society. Right: "What did you soy her last name was?" 
Second (eff: Intermission in neuro lab. Right: "She hos a lovely figure." Third left: Detweiler and Shapiro 
were really funny. Right.- •'Let's get going." Sotfom left: "She Isn") listed." Right: Pierce Smith at the books. 



73 



A 



C T I V I T I E S 




A.O>erEHBACM 




Seated: Irving Acker man, Hans Neuberg, Arthur Hout, Edward Tamler, George Agzorian. Standing: 
Bernard Cooper man, Malcolm MacKenzle, Arthur Snyder, Richard Conroy, James Macdonold, Raymond 

Wilhelmr, Louis Pyle. 



A. O. A. 



Irving Ackerman, Bonquet Chairman 
Donald Adier, Treasurer 
George Agrarian 
Richard Conroy 
Bernard Cooperman 
James Foulks, Secretary 
Arthur Haut, V/ce-Presic/enf 
William Lucas 



James Macdonald 

Malcolm Mac Kenzie 

Hans Neuberg, President 

Louis Pyle 

Edward Tamler 

Martin Silbersweig 

William Silverberg 

Arthur Snyder 



Raymond Wilhelmi 



76 



^^^^^^l^Ki^.^H. 


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M 


id 


^s^r^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 



Seofed: Audrey Brown, B. G. Wagner, Aimee Diefenbach, Billy Jones. Standing: Israeli Joffe, Alfred Messer. 



YEARBOOK STAFF 



EDITOR . 



Israeli Jaffe 



BUSINESS MANAGER Alfred Messer 



ADVERTISING 



Charles Blair 



_. Alfred Messer 

Elrrier Specht 



LITERARY - Audrey Brown 

Billy Jones Livingston Parson, Jr. Sidney Fink 

B. G. Wagner Dorothea Kerr Robert Butler 

Edward Williams 

ART Aimee Diefenbach 

PHOTOGRAPHY Israeli Jaffe 

Barry Blumberg Jerry Dickenson Sidney Fink 



77 




Tow row: Garcelon, Allen, Suechting,, Van Arsdel (Treas.), Proctor 

(Historian), Risbeck, Kidwell. 
Middle row.- Van Home, Fisti (Rushing], Cunnick (Pres.), Hamilton, A. 

Hall. 
Bottom row: Benninghoff, Cox (Custodian), Jacob (Secy.), Payson 



Top row: Leeuwen, Walsh, Stormont, Middleton, Decker |V. Pres.), 

O'Connell, Jameson, Van Poznak, Hume. 

Middle row: Neuberg, Hanlon, Cominsky, Davis, Parsons, McKenna. 

Bottom row,' Pyle, Tompkins, Macdonald, Dominick, Curtis. 



NU SIGMA NU 




78 



M 




""^W 



PHI DELTA EPSILON 



Top row: Irving Ader, Paul Gerst, Sam Hoch, Bob Kassriel, Roy Jaflfe, 

Arnold Ritterband. Middle row: Steve Firestein, Monte Alenick, Larry 

Ross, Paul Beres, Donald Adier. Bottom row Bob Wilderman, Bob 

Bragg, Bob Silbert, Don Holub. 




79 




UPPER PICTURE Top row; i\uueii u. iiucinuii, /viuiLUb /vi. i\ey, yvii- 

liom C. Waller, Leland M. White, Jock W. Garnont, Frank C. Symonds 



w. Robert S. Trueman, Marcus M. Key, Wil- 
lant, Frank 
w: Duncan M. Johnson, 



nam v^. vvaner, Leiana /w. vvnire, jacK vv. oarnanr, rranK v^. oymonas, 
Nelson D. Helmquist, John M. Bozer. Middle row: Duncan M. Johnson, 
Donald H. Stuhring, Robert S. Sioussot, Billy R. Jones, B. G. Wagner. 
Bottom row: Eriand R. Nelson, Joseph C. Shipp, John E. Ultmann, 




Albert M. Abody 



LOWER PICTURE — Top row.- Jack T. Orr, John F. HefFernan, Jack 
Reynolds, Arthur W. Haelig, Arno Macholdt, John C. O'Loughlin, 
Anthony J. Smith, William U. Van Duyne. Middle row.- Robert M. 
Flowers, Eugene M. Speicher, James W. Smith, Leonard H. Brandon, 
Peter Kornfeld. Bottom row.- William W. Roosen, Kenneth L. 
Crounse, Garth Dettinger, Leslie DeGroot. 



PHI CHI 



80 



"WmtxB the ttinbt bpforr (Ebrtstmas . 



\ Qmiual ^ 





BARD HALL 
^^ ACawt Aimqlmg j^ cOomcmg 




■AT^ 




Top; "Just wait for the pennant, thafs all." Television has mode no inroads on study time. Middle: The 

P&S "house staff" at Cooperstown. Stella dishes il out. Nostalgic Neety at the Christmas party. Soffom- 

Georgia and Freddie keeping an eye on things. The C's. 



82 



THE MEDICAL 
STUDENT 



A PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERVIEW WITH GEORGE (THE TIGER) 

FRANKEL 



Foreword 

IN the fall of 1949, Simon and Schuster published a book entitled 
"The Frenchman" in which LIFE photographer Phillipe Halsman re- 
corded an interview with French movie actor Fernandel. Borrowing 
liberally from this idea, we present the following series of pictures 
with George Frankel as the medical student and photographs by 
Ray Jaffe. 



83 



t 



ItfW 




^^~i 




Do you think it's a good idea to allow medi- 
cal students in Harkness Hall? 



Did you hear that Dr. Loeb is going to be on 
our service this morning? 



What was your reaction when they told you 
that the hookworm ova that you so proudly 
displayed under the microscope belonged to 
you? 



When do you really become a doctor? 



J 



> 



Do medical students have much time for 
social life? 



How did you enjoy the Saturday Clinic on 
the subject, "Desoxyribonuclease in the treat- 
ment of chronic empyema?" 





Discuss hemochromatosis. 



• ■* 



How do you like the new group of probies? 










' /) 








« 



e?^- 







\ /' 



4-^ ''' 







Do you really want to intern at our hospital? 



What is your opinion about Sunday morning 
rounds as an educational experience? 



Is it true that you went into medicine for 
financial remuneration? 



Before we close the conference, are there 
any comments from the back rows? 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



WE acknowledge with thanks the many people who have aided us in the prepa- 
ration of this publication. It is impossible to mention everyone by name because 
space does not permit, but to all who have helped, we extend our sincere gratitude. 

To the members of the entire staff, in all four classes, who provided a large share 
of the written material and photographs, we soy congratulations on a good job and 
best of luck on P&S '51, '52 and '53. 

Our Bard Hall secretary, Betsy Payne, was more than patient when she deciphered 
our illegible script, and translated it to the neat typewritten page. 

Mrs. C and Freddy, at the front desk of Bard, were wonderfully co-operative in 
spite of all the phone calls and messages that deluged the switchboard A word too, 
to the men at "Charlie's desk" who helped us to see that every senior knew when his 
yearbook picture was to be taken. 

When we wanted to know who in the class lived where, and how he could be 
reached stat, Miss Phelps, in the Dean's office, was always ready with her magical 
files of vital statistics. 

Our budget was admirably balonced by Miss Brady, in the Bursar's office. She 
had the most polite way of telling us we'd overdrawn our account. 

Special thanks must go to Mr. Terzian, our photographer, for his many trips from 
the studio in Manhasset, L. I., and for the fine prints of the seniors, the classes and the 
fraternities which he provided. 

Mr. Kelly, our publisher and technical adviser, spent many arduous hours with the 
members of the editorial staff, helping P&S '50 grow from a pencil-sketch embryo to 
a podded-covered adult. 

We are grateful to aur advertis- 
ers, the local merchants, medical 
firms and the contractors at Von- 
derbilt Clinic, without whose sup- 
port this book would not have 
been possible. And lastly, to you 
our subscribers for whom this vol- 
ume was printed, thank you very 
much. We sincerely hope that now 
and in future years, this yearbook 
will provide a pleasant memory of 
P&S in 1950. 

I. A. Joffe, 

Ed. 



:^5^;^<^vxv .^v .x■iS<^ 




87 



THE BOOKSTORE 

EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST 
GOOD WISHES TO 
THE SENIOR CLASS 



MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 



The American Journal of Medicine 




Editor Alexander B. Gutman, m.d.. New York 

Advisory Board 

WALTER W. PALMER, M.D., New York 
DAVID p. BARR, M.D., New York 
FRANCIS c. DLAKE, M.D., New Haven 
ARTHUR L. BLOOMFIELD, M.D., San Francisco 
EUGENE AS STEAD, JR., M.D., Durham 
JOSEPH T. WEARN. M.D., Cleveland 



Publishes the combined Staff Conference 
from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons: also sixteen other Staff Conferences 
each year: the reports of three Investiga- 
tional Societies; two Symposia and over 
1800 pages of new medical findings yearly. 

SUBSCRIPTION CU.S.A.) — SIO yearly 



The American Journal of Medicine, Inc. 

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89 



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M. CITARELLA, Inc. 

WINES and LIQUORS 

3915 BROADWAY 

Near 164th St. New York 32. N. Y. 




BELL RADIO 

and APPLIANCE CO., Inc. 

1170 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

New York 32, N. Y. WAdsworth 7-3194 

Complete line of 

• RADIOS 

• TELEVISION 

• RECORD CHANGERS 

• RECORDS AND ACCESORIES 

• ELECTRICAL HOME APPLIANCES 

SALES AND SERVICE 




HEIGHTS CAMERA 
CENTER 

The Leading Brands in Photographic 

Supplies and Equipment 

at Special Prices 

THE FINEST QUALITY IN PHOTO FINISHING 
DONE ON THE PREMISES 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVE. 

Between 17 1st and 172nd Streets 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA 3-3698 


The Tailor to Bard Hall 
Through the Student Agency 

M. LEVINE 

85 HAVEN AVENUE 

Formerly with Bentham and Phillips, Fifth Ave. 

ALL KINDS OF DRESSMAKING 




SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 BROADWAY 
Corner 168th Street 





90 



THE JOURNAL OF NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE 

An Educational Journal of Neuropsychiatry 
$ 1 2.50 Per Year — Outside Continental U. S. — $ I 3.75 

• 

THE PSYCHOANALYTIC REVIEW 

An Educational American Journal of Psychoanalysis 
$7.00 Per Year — Outside Continental U. S. — $7.70 

• 

THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF CHILD BEHAVIOR 

A Journal Devoted to the Problems of Childhood 
$8.50 Per Year — Outside Continental U. S. — $9.50 

* 

NERVOUS AND MENTAL DISEASE MONOGRAPHS 



NOLAN D. C. LEWIS. M.D., Managing Editor 
70 Pine Street, New York City 5, N. Y. 



THE SHARPIES CORPORATION 

CENTRIFUGAL & PROCESS ENGINEERS 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



91 





THE MEDICAL CENTER 


WAdsworth 3-9034 


CAMERA STORE 


ARMORY BAR & GRILL 


CAMERAS • FILMS 


INC. 


KODAK SUPPLIES • PICTURE FRAMING 


Italian American Cuisine 


571 WEST 168th STREET 




Just across Broadway 


4011 BROADWAY 




Bet. 168th and 169th Sts. New York, N. Y. 


WA 3-0080 




IDENTIFICATION PICTURES OF ALL KINDS 


JOS. M. GAUDIO, Pres. 


ALL GARMENTS INSURED 




For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 


INTERCITY 


Call WAshington Heights 7-3884 


RADIO SERVICE 


D. APPEL 


4066 B'WAY 1285 ST. NICHOLAS AVE. 


EXPERT TAILOR AND FURRIER 


Phone WA 7-8443 


Cleaners and Dyers 


Radios - Phonos - Television 


230 FT. WASHINGTON AVENUE 


RADIO REPAIR SERVICE - PICK UP SERVICE 


Between 169th and 170th Streets 




LO 8-2100 L 326 


HAIRCUT OR A MANICURE 




V. LA PORTA & SON 


See Us for Fraternity and Class 


SIX EXPERTS 


Party Needs 


4005 BROADWAY 




Near 158th Street 


UPTOWN WINE & 
LIQUOR STORE 


■ WAdsworth 8-4910 




CHOICE WINES AND LIQUORS 


Compliments of 


"For the Discriminating" 


REME FOOD, Inc. 




4021 BROADWAY 




Corner 169th Street 


4056 BROADWAY 




Near 1 7 1 st Street New York 32, N. Y. 


Tel. WA 3-9795 



92 



FAMOUS FOR SYLVIAS HOME COOKING 



GIL'S LUNCHEONETTE 

Delicious Sandwiches - Tasfy Salads 

228 FT. WASHINGTON AVE. 
Cor. 169th St. WA 3-8978-9 



Outgoing Orders Promptly Attended to 



WA 3-5263 



"Say it with Flowers" 



Medical Center Flower Shop 

CARDASIS. INC.. FLORIST 

Artistic Decorations for All Occasions 

The Flower Shop Nearest to the Medical Center 

4003 BROADWAY 
At 168th St. New York 32, N. Y. 



CENTER PHARMACY 

HARKAVY & KAPLAN 

4013 BROADWAY, bet. 168th & 169th Sts. 
WA 3-1258 New York, N. Y. 

New England Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

SELBY L TURNER 

Members of Leader's Association 

150 BROADWAY New York 7, N. Y. 

BEekman 3-6620 

Specializing In 
INSURANCE FOR DOCTORS ONLY 

Life, Malpractice, Automobile, 
Fire and Theft, etc. 



MANHASSET WILLIAM TERZIAN long island 



Photographer for the Finer Yearbooks 



93 




A TRIBUTE 



Early last year groundwork was laid for con- 
struction of a cancer research center atop the 
Vanderbllt Clinic of Presbyterian Hospital. By 
mid-summer, with minimum disruption of normal 
routine, an ever-Increasing stream of giant steel 
girders, masonry, lumber and hardware materials 
flowed up to be used in completing the five floors 



which are part of the University's new Institute of 
Cancer Research. This Institute will play a major 
research and clinical role in Columbia's fight 
against cancer. We salute the construction ex- 
perts whose skill and ability have been responsi- 
ble for this addition. 



94 



GENS-JARBOE 

INCORPORATED 



BUILDERS 



95 



BELMONT ELECTRIC CO., Inc., established In 1888, has continuously taken an active 
part in the development of all phases of life in this great city. 

In 1888, the daring modern thing to do was to convert the old mansions 
from gaslight to electricity. We did it. Since then we have participated 
In every type of electrical Installation from delicate experimental dental 
machines to the heaviest construction jobs. Including light and power instal- 
lations for factories, hospitals, barracks, sub-stations, radio and television 
transmitters, stations and studios. 

The construction of the Cancer Research Institute at Vanderbllt Clinic is another 
great achievement for New York and Its people. We are proud to be the electrical 
contractors in this important work. 

BELMONT ELECTRIC CO., Inc. 

570 LEXINGTON AVENUE NEW YORK 



BARKER BROS. 
PAINTING CORP. 

51 EAST 42nd STREET 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 

Telephone: MUrray Hill 7-6923 



Astoria 8-5457 



Aetna Marble Co., Inc. 

Interior Marble, Slate, Bluestone 
and Soapstone 



20-29 38th STREET 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 
CHAS. CACHA FRANK W. SMITH 



96 



STRUCTURAL STEEL 

FABRICATED AND ERECTED 

Behind every GRAND job stands a 44 year reputation 
for performance and dependability. Ability and "know- 
how" are reflected in the servicing of our jobs and in 
the execution of our work. Get a GRAND quotation on 
your next job. 



GRAND IRON WORKS. Inc. 

Established 1904 

525 TIFFANY STREET NEW YORK 

DAy+on 8-2600 



97 





DISTINCTIVE ALUMINUM WINDOWS 


THE ADAMS & WESTLAKE COMPANY 


ELKHART, INDIANA 


Compliments 


GENERAL BUILDERS 




SUPPLY CORP. 


of 




A FRIEND 


205 EAST 42nd STREET 




NEW YORK, NEW YORK 




Telephone: MUrray Hill 4-2300 



98 





Sloane & Moller 


SEXAUER & LEMKE 






Woodworking Co., Inc. 


(Incorporatedj 






Carpenters and Cabinet Makers 


Manufac'urers of 

Architectural Metal Works 






87-28 130th STREET 








RICHMOND HILL, N. Y. 


Office and Works 
Vernon Blvd. at 35th Ave. 






Tel. Virginia 7-4426 


LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 






CHARLES 1. BRANDIN 

INC. 


CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 
SALES - RENTALS - SERVICE 






GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL 
New York 17, N. Y. MU 9-2037 


UNITED HOISTING CO. 

Hoists - Mixers - Saw+ables - Cranes - Vibrators 






Metal Hospital Cabinets - Dressers - Instrument 


Bins - Pumps - Air Tools - Hoppers 






Cabinets - Stainless Steel Tops and Sinks 


5 W. Sheffield Ave. Englewood. N. J. 






ELLISON BAIjANCED ENTRANCE DOORS 


CHiclcering 4-5420 - Eng. 3-8980 






REFRIGERATORS AND COOLING ROOMS 








FOR ALL COMMERCIAL REQUIREMENTS 


MOSLER SAFE COMPANY 






Globe Cork Insulation Co. 








419 WEST 13th STREET 


320 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK, NEW YORK 






New York. Tel. CHelsea 3-0070-1-2 








HARRY SCHRECKINGER 


Largest Builder of Safes and Vaults 
in the World 





99 




^n investment in 
Picker x-ray apparatus is an 
investment in consistently 
high performance over an 
exceptionally long life 




100 



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